• Tag Archives mountain
  • Antisana Mountain Route

    Main Climbing Route: Because of numerous large crevasses that opened up during the 1997 – 1998 season, the traditional Main Summit route has become impassable. Currently the best way to reach the main summit is to follow the route outlined above. The route starts from a base camp situated in a moraine at the base of the North West. Ascend the southern ridge leaving camp to obtain the glacier 1/2 hour away. There is an obvious trail which leads out of base camp.

    Antisana Mountain

    Once on the glacier skirt an ice fall on your left, and head for the saddle between the main summit and the south peak. Once the ice wall has been skirted turn back towards the main summit and follow the glacier to the left of the large rock wall. Continue towards the main summit cap avoiding the many crevasses. Careful route finding is needed through this area as the crevasses are numerous, large and deep. As the grade steepens head left for the triangular snow patch which leads onto the summit cap. This requires a steep 1/2 hour left traverse up and over a large open slot. Protection is a good idea.

    Antisana – 5758 Meters

    Additional Routes: East Peak, North Peak, South Peak, Northeast Peak

    Suggested Reading: Climbing and Hiking in Ecuador, 4th Edition

    Getting There:
    You must contact the Delgado Famliy in Quito to obtain an entry permit. The cost is usually $10 per vehicle. Contact Mario Palleres 5932 455 697 for permit of entry. A four wheel drive vehicle will take you within 30 minutes of base camp. Drive through Pintag heading east towards Hacienda El Hato.

    Just after a gravel mine at the foot of the 200 year old lava flow there is the first of two gates at which you must present your entry permit . You must keep your permit for the second gate further up the road. Take a left just after the entry gate and head east on a beautiful well paved road towards H. El Hato. Continue climbing on this road up into the paramo for at least an hour.

    Also Read : Abandoned Spanish Castle in the Australian Rainforest

    As the road levels and crosses a large paramo plain it will fork. Antisana will be directly in front of you, causing jaw dropping stares. Head left at the fork in the road and towards Antisanilla on your left and Antisana on your right. Shortly after this fork look for a 4 wheel drive track heading off into the paramo on your left. Take this poor road and be careful.

    You will cross a series of up and downs and a few streams before leveling out at the base of Antisanilla. Continue on this track until you see a track heading east towards the mountain just after you have reached the base of Antisanilla. Turn right and follow this road up towards the mountain as far as you can. Basecamp is a 30 minute haul east from the end of this track. Look for cairns and a path up and to the right.


  • Aconcagua Climbing Information Packet

    The Aconcagua Climbing Information Packet covers

    • When to go
    • Weather
    • Routes
    • Health
    • Maps
    • Permits
    • Hotels
    • Guides and mules
    • Getting there
    • Day-by-day climbing reports from SAE members who have climbed Aconcagua
    • Equipment
    • Altitude sickness
    • Recommended reading.

    Want the Aconcagua Climbing Information Packet (Item #53)? Well, it’s $17.00 [Members $15.00] plus P&H. To order, fill out our on-line order form. This is a lengthy packet–we can’t e-mail this, so we’ll send it by regular mail.

    While not technical, Aconcagua is a highly underestimated climb. Traveling with Alpine Ascents and our nearly 30 years of experience, our knowledgeable, expert guides will greatly increase your chances of summiting and being safe on the mountain. Essential logistics like food prep, quality camps, porter options, and days on the mountain may seem like areas where you can “cut corners,” however we profess the importance of these details along with reasonable team sizes (many of our competitors end up combining teams and can have up to 20 people with just a few guides) are paramount to offering a superb experience.

    Over the last 25+ years we have developed a superb system on the mountain that affords you the best chance of proper acclimatization and summit success. Our Vacas Valley and Normal Route departures have numerous extra days built in to the itinerary, and we methodically ascend the mountain with renowned guide staff at the helm. With a seasonal location in Mendoza, we can respond to issues that arise quickly. A low climber-to-guide ratio offers us the ability to closely attend to climbers, which is important to success and safety.

    There may be many personal reasons to choose a particular guide service, but there are four main areas of concern that you should look at carefully: safety record, guides, in-country logistics, and pre-trip planning with the climber. In all four categories, Alpine Ascents ranks highest in the climbing industry. No other guide service has the safety record, quality of guides, finely honed programs, food, care, quality, and customer service that we offer.

    About South American Explorers

    Here are examples of what you’ll find in this information packet:

    Vacas Valley Route: This is the tried and true route that we have been offering since 1990. Quieter, more aesthetically pleasing, and a chance to traverse the mountain, this route employs three camps, and offers ample rest and extra days — Aconcagua at its finest. More about Vacas Valley Route

    Aconcagua Normal Route: This is a shorter and more direct route with lighter pack weight that builds porter support into the program (our Vacas Valley Route has porter options as well). This trip is competitively priced and includes acclimation days as well as a well-appointed Base Camp with less time on the higher mountain camps. More about Normal Route

    Aconcagua Climbing

    Overview of Route